US Army Corps of Engineers
Los Angeles District

Remote sites, key projects

Published Jan. 27, 2017
Louis Munoz (center), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District's dam tender supervisor, discusses Alamo Dam operation with Col. Kirk Gibbs, District commander Jan. 25. The dam provides flood risk reduction, water supply and conservation, recreation, and fish and wildlife enhancement on the Bill Williams River.

Louis Munoz (center), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District's dam tender supervisor, discusses Alamo Dam operation with Col. Kirk Gibbs, District commander Jan. 25. The dam provides flood risk reduction, water supply and conservation, recreation, and fish and wildlife enhancement on the Bill Williams River.

James Boyd, a dam operator at Alamo Dam, briefs John Keever (left), chief of the Construction Division Jan. 25. The dam provides flood risk reduction, water supply and conservation, recreation, and fish and wildlife enhancement on the Bill Williams River.

James Boyd, a dam operator at Alamo Dam, briefs John Keever (left), chief of the Construction Division Jan. 25. The dam provides flood risk reduction, water supply and conservation, recreation, and fish and wildlife enhancement on the Bill Williams River.

Donnie May (right), a dam operator at the Painted Rock facility, discusses his day-to-day duties with Col. Kirk Gibbs, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District commander Jan. 25. The dam is a flood risk reduction project located on the Gila River in Maricopa County about 70 miles southwest of Phoenix. May has been a tender at the site for more than 30 years.

Donnie May (right), a dam operator at the Painted Rock facility, discusses his day-to-day duties with Col. Kirk Gibbs, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District commander Jan. 25. The dam is a flood risk reduction project located on the Gila River in Maricopa County about 70 miles southwest of Phoenix. May has been a tender at the site for more than 30 years.

PHOENIX — When your area of operation covers roughly 226,000 square miles... expect to spend a lot time on the road. 

Taking to the highway Jan. 25, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Commander Col. Kirk Gibbs visited two of the more remote projects in the District inventory. 

"Alamo and Painted Rock Dams are very important to the watershed and Arizona's overall flood risk management," said Gibbs. "The professionalism of our dam tenders at each of those locations and their ability to build great relationships with State Parks, as well as other agencies throughout the state, prepares us to work together in the event of extreme rain events to protect people, structures and agriculture."

Public safety is the Corps' number one priority. Flood risk management structures reduce risk, but they don’t eliminate it.

"Our dams and the surrounding land is very well maintained, added Gibbs. "The District is proud of our professionals who work hard and are dedicated to our critical mission in these remote locations. I am honored to serve alongside them."

Because of the isolation, the Corps provides two houses on each project site.

Painted Rock was completed in 1959, Alamo a decade later. In total, the Corps owns and operates nearly 700 dams nationwide.