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Antiterrorism Awareness Month: Corps leaders remind force to keep resources handy, stay vigilant

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District
Published Aug. 16, 2021
The Army continues to actively promote the iWATCH campaign with a simple theme, "SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING." This program provides our Soldiers, civilians, contractors and the military community the opportunity to report suspicious activity based on observed behaviors and activities.

The Army continues to actively promote the iWATCH campaign with a simple theme, "SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING." This program provides our Soldiers, civilians, contractors and the military community the opportunity to report suspicious activity based on observed behaviors and activities.

LOS ANGELES – It’s been nearly 20 years since this country’s deadliest terrorist attack on 9/11; however, Army leaders at all levels are highlighting Antiterrorism Awareness Month to remind all members of the force that’s no reason to reduce vigilance or become complacent.

Lt. Gen. Scott Spellmon, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers commander, is no exception. As part of an adjoining proclamation he shared with the force, Spellmon said the USACE community “has and must continue to be vigilant every day.”

“Our enemy's tactics continue to change, with us amid COVID and civil protest, providing them a more favorable environment to act,” he wrote in the early August message. “Although large terrorist organizations continue to threaten the U.S., smaller groups and individuals have emerged seeking to cause terrorist acts on our communities. These individuals and small groups present a serious challenge to our security, both at home and abroad.”

With people, resources and facilities throughout the world, this effort requires that members of the Corps balance security with the services they provide to stakeholders, partners and the nation.

“We must continue to conduct antiterrorism training and strengthen our abilities to disrupt terrorist acts,” he wrote. “The Army continues to actively promote the iWATCH campaign with a simple theme, ‘SEE SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING.’ This program provides our Soldiers, civilians, contractors and the military community the opportunity to report suspicious activity based on observed behaviors and activities.”

Glen Tucker, Los Angeles District’s antiterrorism officer and chief of security and law enforcement, also advocates for the Army’s iWATCH and iSALUTE sites, as well as keeping Criminal Investigation Command points of contact and weblinks within reach.

“When aware of the possible indicators of terrorist activity and empowered to help protect the communities against terrorism, the entire Army community acts as ‘sensors’ and becomes an extension of our overall protection,” Tucker said.

The Army’s iWATCH program includes antiterrorism awareness resources to help service members and their families identify and report potential activity. The iSALUTE site allows personnel to report threat incidents, extremist behavioral indicators and other counterintelligence matters.

Individuals also can report a crime or submit a crime tip through the Army CID website or on a smartphone using the CID Crime Tips mobile application.

Spellmon reminds every member of the force that although the Department of Defense uses the month of August to emphasize its importance and complete annual training, antiterrorism awareness is a continuous program throughout the year for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

“It requires leaders at all levels to dedicate resources to ensure the protection of our military and civilian communities,” Spellmon said. “Leaders must promote their programs and educate their communities on what they can do to protect themselves and others from terrorism.”

In addition to the iWATCH, iREPORT and CID, Tucker said individuals can also report suspicious activity to the Joint Regional Intelligence Center by visiting www.jric.org or calling 562-345-1100 or 888-705-JRIC (5742). As always, in an emergency, please call 911.