News Story Manager

A Day at Sepulveda Dam

Published Sept. 13, 2022
Updated: Aug. 19, 2022
A bridged path along connects a walking trail at the Sepulveda Dam Recreational Area. The primary purpose of the dam and reservoir is flood risk management, but the project is also authorized for recreation.

A bridged path along connects a walking trail at the Sepulveda Dam Recreational Area. The primary purpose of the dam and reservoir is flood risk management, but the project is also authorized for recreation. Approximately 1,500 acres have been leased to the City of Los Angeles for recreational purposes. (Photo by Robert DeDeaux, Los Angeles District PAO

The Los Angeles River flows into Sepulveda Dam Aug. 19 in Encino California. Sepulveda Dam was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District and completed in December 1941.

The Los Angeles River flows into Sepulveda Dam Aug. 19 in Encino California. Sepulveda Dam was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District and completed in December 1941. The Corps acquired a total of 2,131.9 acres for construction, operations and maintenance of the dam. Of the total acreage, the Corps reserves 313.0 acres exclusively for operation of the dam. Together with Hansen and Lopez, Sepulveda Dam is vital for flood risk management of portions of the San Fernando Valley and areas contiguous to the Los Angeles River. (Photo by Robert DeDeaux, Los Angeles District PAO)

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Park Ranger Connie Chan-Le poses for a photo during her routine site visit of the Sepulveda Dam Aug. 19 in Encino California.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Park Ranger Connie Chan-Le poses for a photo during her routine site visit of the Sepulveda Dam Aug. 19 in Encino California. Chan-Le has assisted in several safety messages for the recreating public. She has a master’s in environmental planning and management from Johns Hopkins University. (Photo by Robert DeDeaux, Los Angeles District PAO)

A common sunflower grows along a walking path at the Sepulveda Dam Recreational Area Aug. 19 in Encino, California.

A common sunflower grows along a walking path at the Sepulveda Dam Recreational Area Aug. 19 in Encino, California. Other native vegetation identified at and near the reservoir include Fremont cottonwood, sandbar willow, mule fat, coast live oak, California buckwheat and coyote brush. (Photo by Robert DeDeaux, Los Angeles District PAO)

The Los Angeles River flows into Sepulveda Dam continues to provide flood risk management Aug. 19 in Encino California. Sepulveda Dam is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. USACE engages in routine maintenance activities within the operational areas of the Reservoir year-round to maintain the operational capacity of the project.

The Los Angeles River flows into Sepulveda Dam continues to provide flood risk management Aug. 19 in Encino California. Sepulveda Dam is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. USACE engages in routine maintenance activities within the operational areas of the Reservoir year-round to maintain the operational capacity of the project. The Project is an important part of a comprehensive plan for flood risk management in Los Angeles County known as the Los Angeles County Drainage Area. (Photo by Robert DeDeaux, Los Angeles District PAO)

A lone feather along the Los Angeles River Aug 19. at the Sepulveda Dam Recreational Area in Encino California. The open water areas found in the Reservoir attract many waterfowl and shorebirds such as great egrets and double-crested cormorant.

A lone feather along the Los Angeles River Aug 19. at the Sepulveda Dam Recreational Area in Encino California. The open water areas found in the Reservoir attract many waterfowl and shorebirds such as great egrets and double-crested cormorant. The Corps evaluates environmental effects of all actions taken at the Dam and in the Reservoir. Biological surveys are conducted in the Reservoir throughout the year by the Corps and the Corps partner agencies. (Photo by Robert DeDeaux, Los Angeles District PAO)

Steve Grasmick, a private firm logistician and amateur bird photographer, quietly and carefully looks for raptors to photograph Aug. 19 at the Sepulveda Dam Recreational Area in Encino California.

Steve Grasmick, a private firm logistician and amateur bird photographer, quietly and carefully looks for raptors to photograph Aug. 19 at the Sepulveda Dam Recreational Area in Encino California. Grasmick suggests raptors, such as owls and hawks, are one of the best reasons to visit the recreational area. Riparian and upland habitats also host a diversity of passerine species such as Brewer’s blackbird and California towhee. (Photo by Robert DeDeaux, Los Angeles District PAO)

ENCINO, California --U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Park Rangers patrol Sepulveda Dam Aug. 19 in Encino, California.

The park rangers are encouraging community participation for the National Public Lands Day clean up event at nearby Santa Fe Dam in Irwindale Sept. 24.

“Sepulveda Dam is great place to find community members, who care about their natural parks,” said Henry Csaposs, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District park ranger. “In addition to our normal duties, we are informing park visitors about the upcoming cleanup event at Santa Fe Dam. National Public Lands Day is  an opportunity to get together with other nature lovers to beautify and improve our recreational parks.”

Established in 1994, National Public Lands Day is an annual event that falls on the fourth Saturday of September. It is one of the nation's largest single-day volunteer efforts and highlights the connection between people and green space in their communities, inspires environmental stewardship and encourages use of open space for education, recreation and health benefits.

For more information, email ParkrangersLA@usace.army.mil.