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Marina del Rey dredging benefits boater safety and port redevelopment

Published April 6, 2012
A Whitehall Spirit Rowing Club member rows past the dredge Paula Lee April 8 at Marina del Rey Harbor. The dredge is removing sediment from the navigation channel to enhance safety for government, commercial and recreational boaters.

A Whitehall Spirit Rowing Club member rows past the dredge Paula Lee April 8 at Marina del Rey Harbor. The dredge is removing sediment from the navigation channel to enhance safety for government, commercial and recreational boaters.

Dutra Dredging Company of San Rafael, Calif., uses the clamshell dredge Paula Lee to place about 520,000 cubic yards of the sand into barges that tugs will then transport to the Port of Long Beach for its Middle Harbor Redevelopment Project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began a $13 million dredging project April 5 that will remove up to one million cubic yards of accumulated sand from the entrance channel to Marina del Rey Harbor.

Dutra Dredging Company of San Rafael, Calif., uses the clamshell dredge Paula Lee to place about 520,000 cubic yards of the sand into barges that tugs will then transport to the Port of Long Beach for its Middle Harbor Redevelopment Project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began a $13 million dredging project April 5 that will remove up to one million cubic yards of accumulated sand from the entrance channel to Marina del Rey Harbor.

The clamshell dredge Paula Lee scoops up sediment from the Marina del Rey harbor entrance channel during operations in Marina del Rey, Calif., April 5. Removing sediment from the navigation channel there will enhance safety for government, commercial and recreational boaters.

The clamshell dredge Paula Lee scoops up sediment from the Marina del Rey harbor entrance channel during operations in Marina del Rey, Calif., April 5. Removing sediment from the navigation channel there will enhance safety for government, commercial and recreational boaters.

Corps leaders, Los Angeles County officials and first responders gathered to celebrate the start of dredging operations in the harbor at Marina del Rey, Calif., April 5.  Removing sediment from the navigation channel there will enhance safety for government, commercial and recreational boaters.

Corps leaders, Los Angeles County officials and first responders gathered to celebrate the start of dredging operations in the harbor at Marina del Rey, Calif., April 5. Removing sediment from the navigation channel there will enhance safety for government, commercial and recreational boaters.

MARINA DEL REY, Calif. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began a $13 million dredging project April 5 that will remove up to one million cubic yards of accumulated sand from the entrance channel to Marina del Rey Harbor, improving navigational safety and providing material for use at several other locations.

 

“We’ve had problems over the years with sediment,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe. “This project will improve safety for our First Responders and other boaters and has the added benefit of providing material the Port of Long Beach needs. This is truly a win-win.”

 

Dutra Dredging Company of San Rafael, Calif., will use the clamshell dredge Paula Lee to place about 520,000 cubic yards of the sand into barges that tugs will then transport to the Port of Long Beach for its Middle Harbor Redevelopment Project. The remaining sand will be used to renourish a segment of Redondo Beach. This sand will be placed just offshore at Dockweiler State Beach and Redondo Beach.

 

“This project provides benefits at three different locations and demonstrates the sort of multiple beneficial uses that are becoming a necessity in today’s era of increased environmental awareness and diminished financial resources,” said Lt. Col. Steven Sigloch, deputy commander for the Corps’ Los Angeles District.

 

Knabe said the project is an example of how coordination among several levels of government can resolve regional issues.

 

“We’re saving over $85 million and eliminating 47,000 truck trips,” Knabe said, referring to another alternative where  material is hauled to a land disposal area.

 

A port official estimated a similar number of truck trips would be necessary to haul fill material to the port for its redevelopment project.

 

“We’re doing what needs to be done to make the harbor safe,” Knabe said.

 

Dredging is scheduled to take place 24 hours per day, seven days a week, with completion expected in late summer.