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Corps completes Thorpe Rd. Bridge

Published Dec. 19, 2012
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District completed construction on a new bridge across Thorpe Rd which more than triples the flow capacity in the area. The "classic-looking" bridge project also contains retaining walls and the wing walls with a malapai rock veneer to provide aesthetic enhancement to the flood risk management project.

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District completed construction on a new bridge across Thorpe Rd which more than triples the flow capacity in the area. The "classic-looking" bridge project also contains retaining walls and the wing walls with a malapai rock veneer to provide aesthetic enhancement to the flood risk management project.

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- Members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District complete their inspection of the Thorpe Rd. culverts in May 2012 in preparation for work to be done by the District. The Corps completed construction on a new bridge which more than triples the flow capacity in the area.

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- Members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District complete their inspection of the Thorpe Rd. culverts in May 2012 in preparation for work to be done by the District. The Corps completed construction on a new bridge which more than triples the flow capacity in the area.

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District put the finishing touches on the bridge across Thorpe Road and reopened the thoroughfare to complete the project in December.

John Mallin, the District’s construction representative for the Thorpe Road Bridge Construction Project, said this was one of many projects in Flagstaff designed to improve flood risk management for the city.

“This project was designed to remove existing culverts and put in a new bridge to widen the flow area for the Rio de Flag,” Mallin said. “The new bridge more than triples the flow capacity of the river in that area.”

The Corps began the $2.5 million project in June. RCDS was the prime contractor on the project and Hunter Construction was the main subcontractor. Baker Engineering served as the project architect. Mallin said the team coalesced well on the project.

“They all did a great job,” he said. “The contractor got a little bit of a late start because the city wasn’t able to get all the utility work finished. But, we did have really good cooperation and communication with the City of Flagstaff throughout the project.”

Tiffin Miller, project manager for the City of Flagstaff, said the city is pleased with the work the Corps did on the bridge project.

“It came out looking very nice,” Miller said. “The entire road from Aztec to Bonito has been reconstructed, so it’s a whole new street along with the new bridge”

The final project is one Mallin said had a “classy” touch to it. He said the arched bridges are a classic design and the malapai rock veneer along the wing walls and retaining walls really “spruce up” the area. Mallin said the project is another way of demonstrating how the LA District continues to make good on its commitment to “Building Strong and Taking Care of People!”

“This project is one of a series of flood risk management projects we’re doing to help take care of the community,’ he said. “I think it’s a really good and a really classic Corps of Engineers project and I’m very proud to have been a part of it.”