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District commander briefs military engineers

Published April 29, 2013
John Keever (right), chief of Construction Division at the Corps’ Los Angeles District, discusses potential Corps project with attendees at a break during the Business Opportunities Forum held April 25 at the LA Hotel Downtown. Nearly 100 members of the Society of American Military Engineers attended the forum.

John Keever (right), chief of Construction Division at the Corps’ Los Angeles District, discusses potential Corps project with attendees at a break during the Business Opportunities Forum held April 25 at the LA Hotel Downtown. Nearly 100 members of the Society of American Military Engineers attended the forum.

Col. Mark Toy (left), commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District, welcomes members of the Society of American Military Engineers to a meeting held April 25 at the LA Hotel Downtown. Members participated in several panel discussions that addressed potential upcoming business opportunities for civil works and military projects in Southern California, Arizona and Nevada.

Col. Mark Toy (left), commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District, welcomes members of the Society of American Military Engineers to a meeting held April 25 at the LA Hotel Downtown. Members participated in several panel discussions that addressed potential upcoming business opportunities for civil works and military projects in Southern California, Arizona and Nevada.

LOS ANGELES – About 100 military engineers met with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers here April 25 at the LA Hotel Downtown to discuss the district’s proposed fiscal year 2014 budget, the potential impacts of sequestration on Corps projects and upcoming business opportunities.

Col. Mark Toy, commander of the Corps’ Los Angeles District, told members of the Society of American Military Engineers that the budget provides more than $79 million in federal funds for studies, construction and the operation and maintenance of civil works projects in the district.

“The availability of these funds has a direct impact on you and your business opportunities,” Toy said.

Toy said the majority of the funding supports restoration studies and the construction and the operation and maintenance of flood risk reduction and navigation projects. He also advised members that, while the district is attempting to minimize the impacts of the sequestration, it has the potential to affect military projects more than civil works projects.