News Story Manager

Bridge connects community, historic thoroughfare

Published May 5, 2015
Fire and rescue vehicles from the Nogales Suburban Fire District cross the newly opened Nogales Wash Bridge April 17 in Nogales, Arizona. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District constructed the $4 million bridge after the original structure was removed in 2008 as part of a flood control construction project.

Fire and rescue vehicles from the Nogales Suburban Fire District cross the newly opened Nogales Wash Bridge April 17 in Nogales, Arizona. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District constructed the $4 million bridge after the original structure was removed in 2008 as part of a flood control construction project.

Local, county and federal officials joined Chula Vista neighborhood residents April 17 to cut the ribbon ceremonially opening the bridge spanning the Nogales Wash in Nogales, Arizona. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District constructed the $4 million bridge after the original structure was removed in 2008 as part of a flood control construction project.

Local, county and federal officials joined Chula Vista neighborhood residents April 17 to cut the ribbon ceremonially opening the bridge spanning the Nogales Wash in Nogales, Arizona. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District constructed the $4 million bridge after the original structure was removed in 2008 as part of a flood control construction project.

NOGALES, Ariz. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District completed a $4 million bridge in the community of Chula Vista here April 17. The District originally removed the structure in 2008 as part of a flood control construction project.

The new Nogales Wash Bridge is a two-span, I-girder concrete construction with grouted riprap both upstream and downstream to enhance durability of the structure and flood handling capacity of the channel. Additionally, the bridge is designed to cause less in-channel disturbance during a flood event.   

"When you protect a neighborhood, you raise the quality of life for that neighborhood and you provide them some security for the future... there's a big deal," said Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva. 

The bridge provides first responders with enhanced access to the community they serve and helps connect residents to local businesses and reduces delivery time for inbound and outbound products.

"We've reconnected a community; we're taking care of people," said South Pacific Division Commander Brig. Gen. Mark Toy. "I know this bridge is something many are excited about using."