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New hangar unveiled at Davis-Monthan

Published Dec. 17, 2015
Troy Morris (center), project manager, briefs Col. Kirk Gibbs, commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District, at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, Dec. 7. Morris guided Gibbs and Shari Brandt, resident engineer for the Tucson Resident Office, through the newly completed 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group hangar, a 76,746-square-foot facility that features a two-story administration section housing a technical order library, records storage, tool cribs, equipment storage and an observation deck overlooking the hangar floor.

Troy Morris (center), project manager, briefs Col. Kirk Gibbs, commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District, at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, Dec. 7. Morris guided Gibbs and Shari Brandt, resident engineer for the Tucson Resident Office, through the newly completed 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group hangar, a 76,746-square-foot facility that features a two-story administration section housing a technical order library, records storage, tool cribs, equipment storage and an observation deck overlooking the hangar floor.

TUCSON, Ariz. – Col. Kirk Gibbs, commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District joined Brig. Gen. Steven J. Bleymaier, commander, Ogden Air Logistics Complex, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, and Tim Gray, deputy director, 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group, to cut the ribbon officially opening the 309 AMARG hangar at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson Dec. 7.

The nearly $25 million, 76,746-square-foot hangar is large enough to accommodate two C-130 or KC-135 aircraft parked side by side and features an explosion proof electrical system that allows for fuel cell work on aircraft. A two-story administration section houses a technical order library, records storage, tool cribs and equipment storage with an observation deck overlooking the hangar floor.

"In this new facility, which is absolutely phenomenal by the way, especially its huge capacity and its innovative energy strategy, provides a world class facility for a proud team of professional airmen," said Bleymaier.

"A big part of that energy strategy are the 100 kilowatt-hour photovoltaic power panels," said Troy Morris, project manager at the Tucson Resident Office. "Conservatively, the PVs could save $20,000 per year of operation."

"To save even more energy, the hangar uses translucent panels in the walls to allow natural light in and the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system was designed to condition the air where people are working and not in the ceiling area where no one is working," added Morris.

The District broke ground on the facility in February 2012. Okland Construction was the contractor for the project designed by the architectural engineering company AECOM. The facility is expected to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Program Silver certification. LEED is how the U.S. Green Building Council rates a project for its design and achievement in categories like sustainability, water efficiency, energy conservation and design innovation.