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District adds temporary capacity to Cedar Creek flood fighting measures

Published Aug. 18, 2016
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District place segmented sections of temporary protective barriers in the community of Cedar Creek, Arizona, Aug. 17. The project is in response to an Aug. 13 request by the White Mountain Apache Tribe to provide assistance to meet an imminent flood threat. Storm flows from the summer monsoon season, in concert with debris flows from the burned watershed upstream, pose a serious threat because limited flood risk minimization measures (K-rails) are currently in place.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District place segmented sections of temporary protective barriers in the community of Cedar Creek, Arizona, Aug. 17. The project is in response to an Aug. 13 request by the White Mountain Apache Tribe to provide assistance to meet an imminent flood threat. Storm flows from the summer monsoon season, in concert with debris flows from the burned watershed upstream, pose a serious threat because limited flood risk minimization measures (K-rails) are currently in place.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District employees Daryll Fust (right), safety chief, and Kim Gavigan (left), chief of the water resources planning section, tour the Cedar Creek, Arizona, project site Aug. 16. Jim Moye, senior construction representative, led the two on a survey of damage caused in an Aug. 11 storm event. The White Mountain Apache Tribe requested emergency assistance from the Corps to meet the immediate flood risk. The Corps is authorized under Public Law 84-99 to undertake emergency operations and provide flood fight assistance.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District employees Daryll Fust (right), safety chief, and Kim Gavigan (left), chief of the water resources planning section, tour the Cedar Creek, Arizona, project site Aug. 16. Jim Moye, senior construction representative, led the two on a survey of damage caused in an Aug. 11 storm event. The White Mountain Apache Tribe requested emergency assistance from the Corps to meet the immediate flood risk. The Corps is authorized under Public Law 84-99 to undertake emergency operations and provide flood fight assistance.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District employees Reuben Sasaki (red shirt), hydrologic engineer, and Jim Moye (red cap), senior construction representative, led a site survey for members of the construction team in Cedar Creek, Arizona, Aug. 15. The group toured areas where potential flood and debris flows could threaten lives and structures. The White Mountain Apache Tribe was affected by the Cedar Creek Fire which burned approximately 46,000 acres on their reservation and negatively impacted many of the tribal/non-tribal communities in the area. The National Weather Service forecasts include the potential for substantial flows in Cedar Creek resulting from thunderstorms in this region.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District employees Reuben Sasaki (red shirt), hydrologic engineer, and Jim Moye (red cap), senior construction representative, led a site survey for members of the construction team in Cedar Creek, Arizona, Aug. 15. The group toured areas where potential flood and debris flows could threaten lives and structures. The White Mountain Apache Tribe was affected by the Cedar Creek Fire which burned approximately 46,000 acres on their reservation and negatively impacted many of the tribal/non-tribal communities in the area. The National Weather Service forecasts include the potential for substantial flows in Cedar Creek resulting from thunderstorms in this region.

CEDAR CREEK, Ariz. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District dispatched personnel and resources Aug. 14 to assist the White Mountain Apache community with its limited flood risk minimization measures.

Anne Hutton, the District's chief of Emergency Management explained that the project was made possible through a provision of PL 84-99 that allows the Corps to provide technical and direct assistance in advance of a flood event when we can show an imminent threat of unusual flooding.

"A series of four storm-related floods June 28 - 29, July 2 and Aug. 11 - with debris flows from the burned watershed upstream - prompted a release of emergency funding for flood fighting measures," said Hutton.

The Cedar Creek Fire burned approximately 46,000 acres of the Fort Apace Reservation between June 17 and July 2.

"Because of the greater than average fire-related flood risk this storm season, the Corps has identified that risk reduction measures are most needed for the lower stream-bank areas of Cedar Creek," added Hutton.

Flood fighting measures will include strategic installation of approximately 1.5 miles of temporary protective barriers along the Cedar Creek.

The Corps provides engineering services to respond to national and natural disasters to minimize damages and help in recovery efforts.