News Story Manager

Colorado Lagoon takes second step toward restoration

Los Angeles District Public Affairs Office
Published Aug. 24, 2012
Posters at a ceremony for the Colorado Lagoon Ecosystem Restoration Project show the effects of uncontrolled runoff and litter on the water body and recognize the partners who contributed to the successful completion of the second phase of the project to return a healthy, vibrant natural resource to residents and visitors to the area.

Posters at a ceremony for the Colorado Lagoon Ecosystem Restoration Project show the effects of uncontrolled runoff and litter on the water body and recognize the partners who contributed to the successful completion of the second phase of the project to return a healthy, vibrant natural resource to residents and visitors to the area.

Col. Mark Toy, commander of the Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District, shares thoughts with Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster before the news conference announcing completion the second phase of the Colorado Lagoon Ecosystem Restoration Project. The city will hold a public ceremony Saturday, Aug. 25, for the reopening of the lagoon for public use.

Col. Mark Toy, commander of the Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District, shares thoughts with Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster before the news conference announcing completion the second phase of the Colorado Lagoon Ecosystem Restoration Project. The city will hold a public ceremony Saturday, Aug. 25, for the reopening of the lagoon for public use.

LONG BEACH, Calif. -- Officials from the City of Long Beach, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and a number of other agencies and support groups announced the completion of the second phase of the restoration of Colorado Lagoon at a news conference held Aug. 23 along the shore of the historic body of water.

The restoration of the lagoon includes three phases. The first, elimination of the flow of contaminated material and trash into the lagoon, was completed in 2010 when the city installed mechanical gates and other structures to capture and divert stormwater runoff. The third and final phase, anticipated to occur in the next five years, will construct an open water conveyance between the lagoon and the adjacent Marine Stadium Park, and the Pacific Ocean, to reestablish a more natural tidal flow.

The just-completed phase removed contaminated sediment from the lagoon and re-contoured the banks to assist with tidal flow.

City officials will hold an official public ceremony Aug. 25 to commemorate the reopening of the lagoon.